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Best Way to Get Kids to Like Science? Inspire Teachers

By Hillary Lauren

Science teachers and principals from Schmitz Park and Arbor Heights Elementary Schools in West Seattle attended a day-long workshop co-hosted at the Institute for Systems Biology. During their visit to ISB, the educators were enthusiastic to collaborate, learn about new curriculum materials, and see first-hand what an innovative science research space looks like at ISB.

“The day signified much more than these teachers learning about some instructional materials,” said Dan Gallagher, the Science Program Manager for Seattle public schools. “Two different schools, with both principals side by side, working together on their desire…to improve science education for their students is pretty awesome.”

The workshop centered around learning about curriculum materials developed by the University of

Educators from Schmitz Park and Arbor Heights elementary schools experienced the open, collaborative environment of ISB’s labs that’s necessary to practice systems biology.

California at Berkeley for 2nd-5th graders. The curriculum, called “Seeds of Science/Roots of Reading,” integrates inquiry-based science investigations with literacy activities that align with the Next Generation Science Standards. The Standards are the most recent effort in science education and were recently adopted by Washington state, an effort that ISB has actively supported.

The Institute for Systems Biology is committed to improving science education by directly engaging students in science to supporting the professional development of teachers and science educators.

Hillary Lauren is a communications specialist volunteering at ISB. Visit her site.

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